Society for History Education, Inc.
A non-profit organization and publisher of The History Teacher since 1967

The History Teacher
(ISSN: 0018-2745)
is a peer-reviewed
quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 50 (2016-2017)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.


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The History Teacher cover

The History Teacher
Volume 44, No. 2
February 2011

The History Teacher

Volume 44, No. 2
February 2011
 

Cover: Pocahontas statue, photographed in 2003.

"Pocahontas" greets visitors alongside the rural highway road in the town of Pocahontas in Pocahontas County, Iowa; the tepee structure has since been removed.

Pocahontas has been reimagined for various uses in numerous historic and artistic interpretations, from fine art, to folk art, to film, and, of course, to history textbooks.

Dominique Padurano uses a variety of images to teach students about visual source analysis, critical thinking, the creation of history, and more in the article, "'Isn't That a Dude?': Using Images to Teach Gender and Ethnic Diversity in the U.S. History Classroom--Pocahontas: A Case Study," which begins on page 191 of this issue.


The History Teacher
Volume 44, No. 2
February 2011

Front Matter | Back Matter

THE CRAFT OF TEACHING

Answers to the Question: "Who Developed Race?"
  by Jason Eden   (pp. 169-177)

Enabling Students to Read Historical Images: The Value of the Three-Level Guide for Historical Inquiry
  by Barbara Ormond   (pp. 179-190)

"Isn't That a Dude?": Using Images to Teach Gender and Ethnic Diversity in the U.S. History Classroom--Pocahontas: A Case Study
  by Dominique Padurano   (pp. 191-208)

Building A Faculty-Led Study Abroad Program: From Development to History Pedagogy in Istanbul
  by Matthew T. Herbst   (pp. 209-226)

THE STATE OF THE PROFESSION

Constructivism and Revitalizing Social Studies
  by Rida Blaik-Hourani   (pp. 227-249)

Bridging the Gap: On Ways to Improve Collaboration between Secondary Teachers and University Professors
  by Patricia Juarez-Dappe   (pp. 251-259)

NOTES AND COMMENTS

It's Not the End of the World, But You Can See It From Here: The Importance of Local History in a Rural Setting
  by Kim Perez and Steven Kite   (pp. 261-272)

Beyond the Classroom: Finding the First Cornerstone
  by Daniella K. Garran   (pp. 273-284)

Teaching Historical Skills through JSTOR: An Online Research Project for Survey Courses
  by Brent J. Ruswick   (pp. 285-296)

Revisiting the Personal Essay with Ben Hamper's Rivethead
  by Jacob Kramer   (pp. 297-301)

REVIEWS

Full Reviews Section   (pp. 303-315)

Busch, John Laurence. Steam Coffin: Captain Moses Rogers and the Steamship Savannah Break the Barrier
  by Edward F. Finch

de Jong, Greta. Invisible Enemy: The African American Freedom Struggle after 1965
  by Jamie J. Wilson

Emmons, David M. Beyond the American Pale: The Irish in the West, 1845-1910
  by Jeffrey O'Leary

Horner, William T. Ohio's Kingmaker: Mark Hanna, Man and Myth
  by Nicholas Katers

Levin, Joanna. Bohemia in America, 1858-1920
  by Julia Guarneri

Nellis, Eric. An Empire of Regions: A Brief History of Colonial British America
  by Michael Gialanella

Oberg, Michael Leroy. Native America: A History
  by Angela Firkus

Parsons, Timothy H . The Rule of Empires: Those Who Built Them, Those Who Endured Them, and Why They Always Fall
  by Kathryn Green

Salomon, Carlos Manuel. Pío Pico: The Last Governor of Mexican California
  by Donna M. Binkiewicz

Ward, Kyle. Not Written in Stone: Learning and Unlearning American History Through 200 Years of Textbooks
  by David Reader

IN EVERY ISSUE

167   Contributors to The History Teacher
317   Questionnaire for Potential Reviewers
318   Membership/Subscription Information
320   Submission Guidelines for The History Teacher

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178   Harlan Davidson: New Titles from Harlan Davidson!
250   Association for Asian Studies: Teach About Asia, Learn About Asia
260   Bedford/St. Martin's: The Best-Selling Text for the AP Course
302   Society for History Education: The Extraordinary Teacher
316   Society for History Education: Advertise in The History Teacher
Cover 4   Organization of American Historians: Become a Member of the OAH Today!


CONTRIBUTORS

Rida Blaik-Hourani graduated from the University of Melbourne. She holds a Ph.D. in Artistic and Creative Education. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at the Emirates College for Advanced Education, teaching at the Post Graduate Diploma of Education and Bachelor of Education levels. She has been involved in several researches that embody curriculum studies and sociology of education.

Jason Eden earned his Ph.D. in History from the University of Minnesota. He is currently an Assistant Professor of History at Saint Cloud State University, in Minnesota, where he teaches courses dealing with early America, historical methods, the racial history of the United States. His research interests include Atlantic World History, Religious History, and Native American Studies. He has presented papers and published articles dealing with gender, age norms, and religious culture in colonial Massachusetts.

Daniella K. Garran was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland. After receiving her B.A. in History and Art History from Connecticut College, she went on to obtain her M.A. in Education from Tufts University, where she became passionate about writing and implementing curriculum. Daniella has been teaching seventh grade social studies and seminars at the Cape Cod Lighthouse Charter School since 2003. She especially enjoys teaching about ancient Greece.

Matthew T. Herbst is Director of the University of California, San Diego's Making of the Modern World Program, which provides a global perspective on the past, from antiquity to the present, to all Eleanor Roosevelt College undergraduates. Dedicated to internationalizing the undergraduate experience, he has designed programs in Europe (Paris and Istanbul) and Southeast Asia (Bangkok) and recruited faculty for other locations. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in History from the University of Michigan and his B.A. from Binghamton University.

Patricia Juarez-Dappe is an Associate Professor of History at California State University, Northridge. She received her Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2002. She is the author of When Sugar Ruled: Economy and Society in Northwestern Argentina, Tucumán, 1876-1916. She was appointed Teaching Fellow for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences in 2008-2009.

Steven Kite received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 2003. His research focuses on public history, rural political movements, and labor history. He has taught at Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Oklahoma, Fort Hays State University, and currently teaches at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith.

Jacob Kramer has a Ph.D. in History from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is currently an Assistant Professor of History at Borough of Manhattan Community College. In the 2005-2006 academic year, he was a writing fellow at Queens College, and has previously written for The History Teacher, Reviews in American History, and History News Network.

Barbara Ormond is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education at the University of Auckland, in the disciplines of History, Social Sciences, and Art History Education, preparing students to teach in secondary schools. Ormond taught and held Senior Management roles at Selwyn College in Auckland for eighteen years. In addition to being involved in various national assessment, moderator, and curriculum initiatives, Ormond published The Iconography of Visual Culture and Pedagogical Approaches to Seeing--Illustrated Prints Pertaining to Religious Issues in Early Modern England in 2008.

Dominique Padurano received her Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 2007, M.S.Ed. from Dowling College in 1998, and A.B. magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1993. A teacher at Horace Mann School in New York City, Padurano is currently writing a biography of fitness icon Charles Atlas. Tentatively titled Making American Men: The Life and Times of Charles Atlas, her work uses the career of this Italian immigrant as a way to understand Americans' changing conceptions of gender, sexuality, childhood, and ethnicity during the first half of the twentieth century.

Kim Perez received her Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma in 2006. Her research interests include the history of nature study and science education, women's participation in science, and public history. She developed an interest in local history after accepting a position at Fort Hays State University and learning more about the rich history of the local region.

Brent J. Ruswick earned his Ph.D. in the history of science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has an undergraduate degree in secondary education from the University of Nebraska-Omaha. His forthcoming book with Indiana University Press is Almost Worthy: The Poor, the Paupers, and the Science of Charity in America, 1877-1917. Presently, he is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Central Arkansas, where he also supervises secondary education social studies student teachers.


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Online Reading Room:
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