Society for History Education, Inc.
A non-profit organization and publisher of The History Teacher since 1967

The History Teacher
(ISSN: 0018-2745)
is a peer-reviewed
quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 52 (2018-2019)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.


About the Organization
The History Teacher Archives
Contributing Materials
Advertisement Placements
Permissions and Copyrights
Student and Teacher Awards
Memberships/Subscriptions

AHA-SHE Joint Membership for K-12 Teachers
The History Teacher, the American Historical Review, Perspectives on History, and AHA membership


The History Teacher
Society for History Education
CSULB - 1250 Bellflower Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90840-1601
(562) 985-2573
info@thehistoryteacher.org


The History Teacher cover

The History Teacher
Volume 52, No. 3
May 2019

The History Teacher

Volume 52, No. 3
May 2019
thehistoryteacher.org/M19

Front Cover: Se-Quo-Yah / R.T.; drawn, printed & coloured at I. T. Bowen's Lithographic Establishment, No. 94 Walnut St. Lithograph published by F. W. Greenough, ca. 1838. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZC4-4815. https://www.loc.gov/item/93504544/.

Back Cover: Tshusick. An Ojibway woman / A.H.; drawn, printed & coloured at I. T. Bowen's Lithographic Establishment No. 94 Walnut St. Lithograph published by E. C. Biddle, ca. 1837. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-DIG-pga-07591. https://www.loc.gov/item/95503208/.

These images from the Library of Congress were originally published in 1836 in the first volume of History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs. Embellished with One Hundred and Twenty Portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington, by Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall.

While these selections prominently feature elements of writing to coincide with this issue's theme, the portraits in History of the Indian Tribes showcase a variety of cultural artifacts such as headwear, clothing, jewelry, weaponry, and even child care equipment. The portraits are readily available at several online collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the University of Washington Libraries, the University of Cincinnati Libraries, and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France.

Students attentive to detail may be delighted—or even dismayed—to discover slightly different versions of the artwork, as well as slightly different citation information (such as various artist names, publishing companies, and publication years). Prodding further, students will unearth a saga of publishing obstacles, funding miscalculations, and a disastrous fire at the Smithsonian that consumed most of the original oil portraits.

With fires, floods, and other unfortunate events destroying historical records to this very day, the quest of finding—and citing—evidence becomes even more of an adventure for students. In "Follow the Footnote," Marni Davis and Jill E. Anderson offer a ready-to-use activity to set history students on a path to success.

We hope you and your students enjoy the possibilities presented in this edition of The History Teacher, a special-focus issue on Writing in History.


The History Teacher
Volume 52, No. 3
May 2019

Front Matter | Back Matter

THE CRAFT OF TEACHING

Writing in History

Historians' Social Literacies: How Historians Collaborate and Write
  by Jeffery D. Nokes and Alisa Kesler-Lund   (pp. 369-410)

Scaffolding the Writing of Argumentative Essays in History: A Functional Approach
  by Silvia Pessoa, Thomas D. Mitchell, and Benjamin Reilly   (pp. 411-440)

Situated Word Inquiry: Supporting Inquiry and Language-Rich Environments through Technology-Mediated, Contextualized Word Learning
  by Tina L. Heafner and Dixie Massey   (pp. 441-460)

Writing in the Eighteenth Century
  by Heather Morrison   (pp. 461-475)

Follow the Footnote
  by Marni Davis and Jill E. Anderson   (pp. 477-498)

NOTES AND COMMENTS

The Politics of Evil: Teaching a Political Violence Film Course
  by Joe P. Dunn   (pp. 499-522)

REVIEWS

Full Reviews Section   (pp. 523-535)

Carter, Sarah Anne. Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World
  by John H. Bickford III

Charles, Patrick J. Armed in America: A History of Gun Rights from Colonial Militias to Concealed Carry
  by Cari S. Babitzke

Fallace, Thomas D. In the Shadow of Authoritarianism: American Education in the Twentieth Century
  by Mark Oromaner

Jackson, Peter. The Mongols and the Islamic World: From Conquest to Conversion
  by Ali İğmen

Kelly, Matthew Kraig. The Crime of Nationalism: Britain, Palestine, and Nation-Building on the Fringe of Empire
  by Kenneth Shonk Jr.

Martinez, Monica Muñoz. The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas
  by John Weber

Parsons, Anne E. From Asylum to Prison: Deinstitutionalization and the Rise of Mass Incarceration after 1945
  by Clarence Jefferson Hall Jr.

Patiño, Jimmy. Raza Sí, Migra No: Chicano Movement Struggles for Immigrant Rights in San Diego
  by Elvia Rodríguez

IN EVERY ISSUE

367   Contributors to The History Teacher
536   The History of The History Teacher
537   Questionnaire for Potential Reviewers
538   Membership/Subscription Information
540   Submission Guidelines for The History Teacher

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE

410   Society For History Education: Celebrating 50 Years
476   Association for Asian Studies: Discover Asia


CONTRIBUTORS

Jill E. Anderson is a Humanities Librarian at Georgia State University. Anderson received her Ph.D. from Rutgers University, and is the author of several articles on information literacy and history instruction and on post-World War II girls' literature and culture. She is currently working on a project on post-war girl poets and intellectual culture.

Marni Davis is an Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University. Davis received her Ph.D. from Emory University, and is the author of Jews and Booze: Becoming American in the Age of Prohibition (New York University Press, 2012). She is currently writing about immigrant neighborhoods and urban renewal in the Jim Crow South. She is also the co-founder of teachingatlanta.org, a website for college and high school instructors who want to utilize the city in their curriculum.

Joe P. Dunn is the Charles A. Dana Professor of History and Politics, and the Department Chair at Converse College. He received a B.S. in History from Southeast Missouri State University, an M.A. and Ph.D. in History from the University of Missouri, and also completed post-doctorate work in Political Science at Duke University. Dunn has authored/edited six books and over seventy-five articles, and is the recipient of thirteen teaching awards.

Tina L. Heafner earned her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is a Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Heafner is the 2018-2019 President-Elect of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Her publications include eleven co-authored books, including Beginning Inquiry: Short Texts for Inexperienced Readers in U.S. History (Social Studies School Service, 2017) and Seeds of Inquiry: Using Short Texts to Enhance Student Understanding of World History (Social Studies School Service, 2016).

Alisa Kesler-Lund is an Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University. She received a Ph.D. in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy from Michigan State University in 2012. She researches the work of history in K-12 classrooms and has studied elementary students' engagement in historical thinking in classrooms and museums, how teachers co-plan historical thinking lessons, and teachers' interaction during "Lesson Study." She currently teaches a methods of teaching course and a course on democratic classroom design.

Dixie Massey is Program Coordinator of the Reading Endorsement at the University of Washington, where she is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Language, Literacy, and Culture. She is co-author, along with Tina Heafner, of Strategic Reading in World History and Strategic Reading in U.S. History (Social Studies School Service, 2006); Targeted Vocabulary Strategies for Secondary Social Studies (Social Studies School Service, 2012); and the Seeds of Inquiry series (Social Studies School Service, 2016).

Thomas D. Mitchell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar. He holds a Ph.D. in Rhetoric from Carnegie Mellon University. Mitchell has published on history writing in Linguistics and Education and the Journal of Second Language Writing.

Heather Morrison is an Associate Professor and Department Chair at the State University of New York at New Paltz. She teaches a range of courses in history, including a writing-intensive seminar on "The Enlightenment," a freshman seminar on "Youth Culture in Europe," and a senior seminar on "Eighteenth-Century Travel." She has worked on developing faculty-generated departmental and university-wide curricular improvement initiatives. Her scholarly publications focus on the enlightenment in Vienna in the 1780s.

Jeffery D. Nokes (Ph.D., Teaching and Learning, University of Utah) is an Associate Professor in the History Department at Brigham Young University. A former secondary teacher, his research focuses on history instruction, historical literacy, teacher preparation, and civic engagement. He wrote Building Students' Historical Literacies: Learning to Read and Reason with Historical Texts and Evidence (Routledge, 2013) and co-authored Explorers of the American West: Mapping the World through Primary Documents (ABC-CLIO, 2016).

Silvia Pessoa is an Associate Teaching Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar. She holds a Ph.D. in Second Language Acquisition from Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests include writing in the disciplines. She has published on history writing in Linguistics and Education and the Journal of Second Language Writing.

Benjamin Reilly is an Associate Teaching Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar. He holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Pittsburgh. He has published extensively on environmental history.


The History Teacher cover

Cover 4
The History Teacher
Volume 52, No. 3
May 2019

The History Teacher cover

Feature on Page 366
The History Teacher
Volume 52, No. 3
May 2019


The History Teacher
The Print Edition
Volume 52
2018-2019


THT on Facebook
facebook.com/thehistoryteacher.org

THT on Twitter
twitter.com/THTjournal


Online Reading Room:
Gaming in the
History Classroom

from The History Teacher


Online Reading Room:
Comics, Cartoons,
and Graphic Novels

from The History Teacher


Online Reading Room:
Wikipedia, Twitter, and
"Instant Historying"

from The History Teacher


 
The History Teacher
Ⓒ Society for History Education, Inc.