Society for History Education, Inc.
A non-profit organization and publisher of The History Teacher since 1967

The History Teacher
(ISSN: 0018-2745)
is a peer-reviewed
quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 51 (2017-2018)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.


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The History Teacher cover

The History Teacher
Volume 51, No. 3
May 2018

The History Teacher

Volume 51, No. 3
May 2018
thehistoryteacher.org/M18

Front Cover: Kelly Ingram Park, Birmingham, Alabama. Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith, 25 February 2010. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-DIG-highsm-05056. https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636933/.

Back Cover: Kelly Ingram Park, Birmingham, Alabama. Photograph by Carol M. Highsmith, 3 March 2010. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-DIG-highsm-05110. https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636980/.

While many historical monuments capture well-known heroes in moments of triumph, the sculptures in Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama include homages to the harrowing and heartbreaking struggles of the Civil Rights Movement.

The U.S. National Park Service's "We Shall Overcome: Historical Places of the Civil Rights Movement" marks Birmingham as the "site of the first mass beatings of freedom riders, [which] was selected by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) for a massive protest campaign. Kelly Ingram Park (historically known as West Park) was an assembly point for participants in the SCLC's Project 'C' (for Confrontation)—sit-ins, boycotts, marches, and jailings designed to end segregation in Birmingham."

In May 1963, after days of demonstrations and mass arrests of both children and adults, police and fire departments unleashed a battery of spraying firehoses, striking batons, and snarling dogs. Drawing the attention of local, state, and national officials, as well as an international audience, the protestors, too, had their moment of triumph when "Local merchants removed their 'whites only' signs and desegregated their lunch counters. The newly elected mayor repealed the city's Jim Crow laws and eventually desegregated the library, city golf courses, public buildings, and finally the schools."

This edition of The History Teacher includes the second of a two-part feature on "Race in the United States," beginning with Stewart Waters and Sara Demoiny's "Using Civil War Monuments as a Catalyst for Race Discussions in Secondary History Classrooms," which begins on page 369.


The History Teacher
Volume 51, No. 3
May 2018

Front Matter | Back Matter

THE CRAFT OF TEACHING

Race in the United States, Part II: Community and Communication

Using Civil War Monuments as a Catalyst for Race Discussions in Secondary History Classrooms
  by Stewart Waters and Sara Demoiny   (pp. 367-386)

Rediscovering "Baptistown": A Historical Geography Project on Local African American History
  by Tamara L. Hunt and Donovan Weight   (pp. 387-407)

Teaching Dixie in the Heartland: Racial and Sectional Imaginaries at a Midwestern University
  by Paul M. Renfro   (pp. 409-426)

Centers and Margins: Exploring Falwell's and King's Constructions of God as a Way to Understand Religious Tensions in a Predominantly White, Evangelical History Classroom
  by Esther June Kim   (pp. 427-444)

Barack Obama, Racial Literacy, and Lessons from "A More Perfect Union"
  by William L. Smith and Ryan M. Crowley   (pp. 445-476)

Student Voices: Collaboration and Conversation

Collaborative Argumentation: Tenth Graders Read Modern Iranian History
  by Gayle Cribb, Crystal Maglio, and Cynthia Greenleaf   (pp. 477-526)

REVIEWS

Full Reviews Section   (pp. 527-535)

Bedasse, Monique A. Jah Kingdom: Rastafarians, Tanzania, and Pan-Africanism in the Age of Decolonization
  by Harry Odamtten

Forner, Karlyn. Why the Vote Wasn't Enough for Selma
  by Brianna P. Nelloms

Hunter, Douglas. The Place of Stone: Dighton Rock and the Erasure of America's Indigenous Past
  by Patricia Cleary

Johnson, Kendall A. The New Middle Kingdom: China and the Early American Romance of Free Trade
  by Pang Yang Huei

Waterfield, Robin. Creators, Conquerors, and Citizens: A History of Ancient Greece
  by Mik Larsen

IN EVERY ISSUE

367   Contributors to The History Teacher
537   Questionnaire for Potential Reviewers
538   Membership/Subscription Information
540   Submission Guidelines for The History Teacher

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE

408   Association for Asian Studies: Teach About Asia, Learn About Asia
536   Society For History Education: Celebrating 50 Years


CONTRIBUTORS

Gayle Cribb holds a B.A. in History from the University of California, Santa Cruz, an M.A. in Education from Stanford University, and teaching credentials in History, Spanish, and Bilingual/Bicultural Education. She taught in a diverse high school for thirty-two years and led a ten-year schoolwide reform in academic literacy using the Reading Apprenticeship Framework, narrowing the equity gap significantly. She currently designs, facilitates, and researches professional development in disciplinary literacy with the Strategic Literacy Initiative at WestEd.

Ryan M. Crowley is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at the University of Kentucky. Ryan completed his doctoral work at The University of Texas after eight years of teaching secondary social studies in Texas. His research interests include critical race theory, critical whiteness studies, and critical approaches to social studies curricula.

Sara Demoiny is an Assistant Professor of Social Science Education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Auburn University. She earned her Ph.D. in Social Science Education from the University of Tennessee and taught middle school social studies before moving into higher education.

Cynthia Greenleaf holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She conducts research to advance students' academic and disciplinary literacy through teacher professional development. Her work aims to create rigorous, supportive, and equitable classroom learning environments for all students. Greenleaf co-directs the Strategic Literacy Initiative at WestEd, where she oversees ongoing research and development, design of learning engagements for teachers and students, and studies of the effects of this work to ensure its impact.

Tamara L. Hunt has a Ph.D. in Modern British History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Author of several books and scholarly articles, she was also the lead researcher on the grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for the Baptistown Project. As former Chair of the History Department at the University of Southern Indiana, she oversaw the social science teaching major for future secondary school teachers. She is now Director of the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program.

Esther June Kim earned an M.A. in Religion at Yale Divinity School, and is currently a Ph.D. student at The University of Texas at Austin in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus on Social Studies Education. Prior to her doctoral studies, she taught high school history and humanities for six years in South Korea and California.

Crystal Maglio holds a B.A. in Urban Studies and an M.A. in Education from Stanford University. Primarily teaching modern world history, she taught at a diverse public high school for twelve years. She serves as the Academic Dean at Leadership Public School in Hayward, California, supporting literacy initiatives at the school, coaching teachers, and facilitating professional development.

Paul M. Renfro is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. His scholarship has been published in Enterprise & Society, Southern Cultures, and American Quarterly. He earned his Ph.D. in History at the University of Iowa in 2016. Renfro is also the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Middle West Review, an interdisciplinary journal focused on the American Midwest and published by the University of Nebraska Press.

William L. Smith is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teaching, Learning & Sociocultural Studies at The University of Arizona. His research and teaching interests center on issues of race, curriculum, and social studies education. William completed a Master's in Teaching and Curriculum from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and earned his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis on Social Studies Education from The University of Texas at Austin.

Stewart Waters is an Assistant Professor of Social Science Education at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He serves as the Assistant Editor for the Journal of Social Studies Research and the Annual Conference Coordinator for the International Society for the Social Studies. He earned his Ph.D. in Social Science Education from the University of Central Florida and taught middle school social studies before moving into higher education.

Donovan Weight received his Ph.D. in History from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He taught previously at the University of Southern Indiana and now teaches at Texas A&M International University (TAMIU). Weight was the 2015 recipient of TAMIU's Instructional Technology Enhancement Excellence Award. His research interests include slavery, race, and religion in early America. He has taught classes on the Atlantic world, early America, African America, and the Civil Rights Movement.


The History Teacher cover

Cover 4
The History Teacher
Volume 51, No. 3
May 2018


The History Teacher
The Print Edition
Volume 51
2017-2018


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