Society for History Education, Inc.
A non-profit organization and publisher of The History Teacher

The History Teacher
(ISSN: 0018-2745)
is a peer-reviewed
quarterly journal.

THT publishes inspirational scholarship on traditional and unconventional techniques
in history education.

Volume 53 (2019-2020)
is delivered internationally
in print to members of the
non-profit organization, the
Society for History Education.


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The History Teacher
The Print Edition
Volume 53
2019-2020


The History Teacher cover

The History Teacher
Volume 53, No. 2
February 2020

The History Teacher

Volume 53, No. 2
February 2020
thehistoryteacher.org/F20

Front Cover: Anomalous motion illusion1.png. Digital image uploaded to Wikimedia Commons by user "Paulnasca" on 18 April 2007. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anomalous_motion_illusion1.png.

Back Cover: Mh stereogramm sis.png. Digital image uploaded to Wikimedia Commons by user "LosHawlos" on 13 June 2003. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mh_stereogramm_sis.png.

As noted in this issue's "Enacting Historical Thinking with Heuristic Organizers" by Sherri Rae Colby, optical illusions can play tricks on our perspective—for inexperienced students and professional scholars alike. On the front cover, a motion illusion causes an appearance of movement within a perfectly still image. Meanwhile, the back cover features an autostereogram, which causes an appearance of a three-dimensional figure within a two-dimensional image.

While the motion illusion takes advantage of how our senses automatically process information, the autostereogram may take additional patience and practice to reveal the hidden figure within, as veterans of the "Magic Eye" craze of the 1990s can attest. As historians, as citizens, as humans in the Information Age, we must be aware that it is surprisingly easy to see something that isn’t really there; likewise, it may be even easier not to see something that is.

We hope you and your students enjoy the possibilities presented in this edition of The History Teacher, which includes special-focus sections on Role-Play in the History Classroom and Elementary and Middle School History.

[Hint: For the autostereogram, start by focusing your vision on something a few feet away, such as a wall. Keep your eyes focused in this far-distance mode and hold The History Teacher close to your face, spine-side up. Again, keep your eyes in far-distance mode and slowly draw the book away from your face. With a little concentration and perhaps a lot of luck, the 3-D figure will emerge—a heart shape.]


The History Teacher
Volume 53, No. 2
February 2020

Front Matter | Back Matter

THE CRAFT OF TEACHING

Role-Play in the History Classroom

How Well Do Structured Controversy Debates—and a Dash of "Fake History"—Promote Historical Thinking?
  by David L. Ellis and Mark A. Vincent   (pp. 209-237)

Early Design Challenges in Developing a Reacting to the Past Game
  by James R. Schiffman   (pp. 239-253)

Elementary and Middle School History

Middle Level Students' Responses to a Guided Inquiry of the Weeping Time
  by John H. Bickford III, Molly Sigler Bickford, and Razak Kwame Dwomoh   (pp. 255-318)

Freedom Summer and the Foot Soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement: Bottom-Up Historical Inquiry to Combat the Master Narrative
  by Jeremiah Clabough and John H. Bickford III   (pp. 319-353)

NOTES AND COMMENTS

Enacting Historical Thinking with Heuristic Organizers
  by Sherri Rae Colby   (pp. 355-375)

REVIEWS

Full Reviews Section   (pp. 377-396)

Clark, Catherine E. Paris and The Cliché of History: The City and Photographs, 1860-1970
  by Lela F. Kerley

Adalet, Begüm. Hotels and Highways: The Construction of Modernization Theory in Cold War Turkey
  by Caterina Scaramelli

Bradley, Stefan M. Upending the Ivory Tower: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Ivy League
  by Elizabeth A. Lundeen

Brown, Marie Grace. Khartoum at Night: Fashion and Body Politics in Imperial Sudan
  by Katie J. Hickerson

Cooper, Frederick. Citizenship, Inequality, and Difference: Historical Perspectives
  by Brendan A. Shanahan

Marten, James. The History of Childhood: A Very Short Introduction
  by Paul Ringel

Purdy, Michelle A. Transforming the Elite: Black Students and the Desegregation of Private Schools
  by Scott A. Cashion

Rankin, Joy Lisi. A People's History of Computing in the United States
  by Lewis Call

Silber, Nina. This War Ain't Over: Fighting the Civil War in New Deal America
  by Michael E. Brandon

Swinth, Kirsten. Feminism's Forgotten Fight: The Unfinished Struggle for Work and Family
  by Katarina Keane

Twarog, Emily E. LB. Politics of the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in Twentieth-Century America
  by Anna Zeide

Wineburg, Sam. Why Learn History (When It's Already on Your Phone)?
  by David Neumann

Yoshikawa, Lisa. Making History Matter: Kuroita Katsumi and the Construction of Imperial Japan
  by Luke Franks

IN EVERY ISSUE

207   Contributors to The History Teacher
376   The History of The History Teacher
397   Questionnaire for Potential Reviewers
398   Membership/Subscription Information
400   Submission Guidelines for The History Teacher

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE

236   Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center: Indian Ocean in World History
254   Association for Asian Studies: Attend an AAS Conference
354   Society for History Education: Celebrating 50 Years


CONTRIBUTORS

John H. Bickford is a former Mid-Prairie (Iowa) Middle School Social Studies Teacher and a current Associate Professor of Social Studies/History Education in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Foundations at Eastern Illinois University. His undergraduate degree in History, graduate degree in Education, and doctoral degree in Secondary Social Studies Education are all from the University of Iowa.

Molly Sigler Bickford has over a decade of experience teaching middle school English/Language Arts. She is currently a Teacher at Charleston Middle School in Charleston, Illinois. Her B.S. and M.S.Ed. are both from Eastern Illinois University. She has teaching and research interests in human rights education within and beyond America’s borders.

Jeremiah Clabough is a former middle and high school Social Studies Teacher and current Associate Professor of Social Studies Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His doctorate in Secondary Social Studies Education is from the University of Tennessee. He has published numerous articles on the role that primary sources play in fostering historical thinking for middle and high school students.

Sherri R. Colby is an Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and an Adjunct Professor of History at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Her research focuses on historical thinking, historical empathy, educational biography, and qualitative methodologies. At TAMUC, she teaches qualitative research, teaching and learning in history, and secondary education. She earned her doctorate in 2008 from the University of North Texas in Curriculum and Instruction, with an emphasis in History Education.

Razak Kwame Dwomoh is a former Ghanaian Social Studies and History Teacher. He earned an undergraduate degree in Economics and History from the University of Cape Coast (Ghana) and a M.S.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction at Eastern Illinois University. He is a doctoral student at Purdue University specializing in Social Studies Education.

David L. Ellis (Ph.D., The University of Chicago) is a Professor of History at Augustana College and is the author of Politics and Piety: The Protestant Awakening in Prussia, 1816-1856 (Studies in the History of Christian Traditions, 186, series ed. Robert J. Bast) (Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, 2017).

James R. Schiffman received a Ph.D. in Communication from Georgia State University in 2012 and began teaching in the Mass Communication Department at Georgia College and State University that same year. Schiffman holds a Master's in Chinese History from the University of Colorado, with a minor field in American History. Schiffman's scholarly interests focus on radio history, and he teaches the History of Broadcasting at GCSU.

Mark A. Vincent (Ph.D., Indiana University) is a Professor of Psychology at Augustana College, and his publications include "Attitude Accessibility and its Consequences for Judgment and Behavior," co-authored with R. H. Fazio, in Influencing Behavior: Theory and Applications in Recreation, Tourism, and Natural Resources Management, ed. Michael J. Manfredo (Champaign, IL: Sagamore Press, 1992).


The History Teacher cover

Cover 4
The History Teacher
Volume 53, No. 2
February 2020

Hint: For the autostereogram, start by focusing your vision on something a few feet away, such as a wall.
Keep your eyes focused in this far-distance mode and hold The History Teacher close to your face, spine-side up.
Again, keep your eyes in far-distance mode and slowly draw the book away from your face.
With a little concentration and perhaps a lot of luck, the 3-D figure will emerge—a heart shape.


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Online Reading Room:
Gaming in the
History Classroom

from The History Teacher


Online Reading Room:
Comics, Cartoons,
and Graphic Novels

from The History Teacher


Online Reading Room:
Wikipedia, Twitter, and
"Instant Historying"

from The History Teacher


 
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